The Advantage of the administration wants to make the International Space Station in business management-venture, NASA …

The White House wants to turn International Space Station into a commercial management company after 2024, according to an internal NASA document obtained by The Washington Post, Feb. 11. (Elyse Samuels/The Washington Post) The Advantage of the administration wants to make the International Space Station, in a sort of orbit of the real estate venture, run not by the government but by the private sector. The White House plans to stop the funding of the station after 2024, the end of direct federal support of the orbiting laboratory. But he did not intend to abandon the orbiting laboratory completely and is working on a transition plan that could turn the station over the private sector, according to an internal NASA document obtained by The Washington Post. “The decision to end direct federal support for the ISS in 2025 does not mean that the platform itself will be deorbited at the time — it is possible that the industry could continue to operate certain elements or capabilities of the ISS in the framework of a future commercial platform,” the document states. “NASA will extend the international and commercial partnerships over the next seven years to ensure the continuity of human access to and presence in low Earth orbit.” In its budget request, which will be published on Monday, the administration would request $ 150 million in fiscal year 2019, with more and more years “in order to allow the development and maturation of the business entities and capacities that will ensure that the successors of the ISS — could include elements of the ISS are operational when they are needed.” The privatisation plan of the station is likely to run into a wall of opposition, in particular because the united States has spent nearly $ 100 billion to build and operate. Last week, the Father of Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) said he hoped that recent reports of NASA’s decision to put an end to the funding of the station “to prove as unfounded as Bigfoot.” He said that the decision was the result of “numskulls” to the Office of Management and Budget. “As a fiscal conservative, you know, one of the most stupid things you can to is to cancel programs after billions of dollars in investment, when there are still severe useful life ahead,” he said. When asked about the possibility of a public-private partnership, he said, “I think we’re open to reasonable proposals that are cost-effective and that use of the investments we’ve made sure to maximize their effectiveness.” President Trump said on Dec. 11 that the UNITED states space policy is on the “dream big” and “the reconquest of America’s proud destiny in space.” (The Washington Post) NASA is studying whether the life of the station could be extended to 2028 or beyond, and Cruz said that any decision should be based on this report. But some questioned who would take control of the station. “The ISS is built for science and human exploration, it’s not built for the pursuit of profit,” said Andrew Rush, the chief executive officer of Made In Space, a company that uses 3-D printing to fabricate objects on the space station. Frank Slazer, vice president of space systems for the Aerospace Industries Association, said the plan could also prove sticky with the station’s international partners. “It will be very difficult to turn the ISS into a real commercial outpost because of the international agreements that the united States is involved in,” he said. “It is by nature always going to be an international concept that requires the government of the UNITED states of involvement and multinational cooperation.” Boeing, which has been involved with the station since 1995, operates the station for NASA, which cost the agency $ 3 billion to $ 4 billion. Last month, while reports have been circulating about NASA pulling the plug on the station, Mark winner; terry evans, Boeing space station program manager, said: “walking away from the International Space Station now would be a mistake, threatening American leadership and hurt the commercial market as well as the scientific community.” In a statement, Sunday, he said that “the delivery of a rare item of national heritage, to commercial firms before the private sector is ready to support it, it could have disastrous consequences for American leadership in space and for the chances of the construction of the space-oriented private enterprise.” The interior of the NASA document has little detail on how the privatization of the workstation. As it prepares for a transition plan, the White House has declared that “the application of market analysis and business plans of the commercial sector and solicit plans of the commercial sector.” The transition of the station to mark another bold step for NASA by rotating around the access to what is known as low Earth orbit to the private sector, so that the space agency will focus its resources on the exploration of deep space. Under the presidency of George W. Bush, NASA has taken the first steps to outsource cargo supply flights to the station, SpaceX and Orbital ATK. President Barack Obama has extended this model to leases of Boeing and SpaceX to fly astronauts. Now, the Trump card of the administration wants to push the public-private partnership still further to foster “the emergence of an environment in [low Earth orbit] and where NASA is one of the many clients of non-government human space flight to the management and operation of the company, while providing a smooth and uninterrupted transition,” the document said. He did not immediately suggest what private enterprise can do with the station or what business might take over. NASA astronaut and Expedition 51 commander Peggy Whitson handed over command of the International Space Station to Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin on the 1st of June. ()

Add Comment